rethink-designing-transitions

The event is free of charge and will go live on www.fuorisalone.tv

June 16, 2020

18:00 — 18:15 ⁠

Stories on demand

Tommaso Nervegna

Service & Experience Design Lead at PwC Italy

Laura Trivilino

Service Design Manager at PwC Italy

Disoriented by the context, and not confident in using the tools that we have usually placed at the service of transformation, we, as designers, must now necessarily adopt approaches seen before as radical. This is particularly true for who operates as service designer within PwC: being one of the Big 4, PwC is today on the edge of the event horizon, with a privileged view on the possible social and economic transformations that lie ahead of us, but also invested with the huge responsibility of driving our clients down an unfamiliar, blurred road. What does "employee experience" mean from now on? Who are the new employees and the new users? We need a global rewriting of our vocabulary. Do major transformation projects still make sense? Or, in such an uncertain context, do we need to focus on incremental, reduced, and historically less appreciated approaches due to their lower profit? How can we propose deep transformation strategies to clients who, while looking for a change, need to control their budgets and validate every investment? This is the real radical scenario for service designers: the exploration of the thin balance between radical social transformation and the concept of sustainability in its broadest, especially economic, sense.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesco Cancellato

Deputy Editor in Chief at Fanpage

June 17, 2020

12:30 — 13:00

Stories on demand

Luca Sacchi

Mobility Expert

It’s something we’ve done from the origins of humankind, nevertheless it seems that the need to move is more than ever a key element in our lives, in those of our cities and for the economy as a whole. Disruptive start-ups managed to collect millions in funding, technologies as old and simple as the bicycle are the symbol of the mobility of the future — and this in order to make our cities more sustainable. Nobody can deny the importance of this goal, but we can and should discuss how we are applying design, social and business principles to reach it. Among the topics that will be discussed are the enabling factors of the changes in mobility, their positive and negative sides and how much misinformation and political shortcuts could stifle this evolution.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesco Cancellato

Deputy Editor in Chief at Fanpage

16:30 — 18:00

Workshop

Designing in the times of uncertainty

invite-only

Come disegnare nuovi processi e strategie per far fronte al cambiamento?
Nonostante la grande emergenza e gli enormi cambiamenti degli ultimi mesi, ci troviamo in un momento estremamente florido per la cultura progettuale: mai come oggi, infatti, gli attori economici, pubblici e privati, di ogni scala e settore, si trovano a dover reagire rapidamente a trasformazioni profonde e radicali che riguardano gli assetti organizzativi, le competenze, gli strumenti, le modalità di lavoro.
In questo scenario, il tema del ‘come’ progettare servizi in grado di rispondere alle sfide socio-economiche e ambientali diventa argomento centrale, e ancor di più emerge la necessità di far leva sulle competenze strategiche del Service Design.
Ma cosa vuol dire costruire una strategia progettuale efficace in un periodo di transizione sociale ed economico come quello che stiamo affrontando? Quali sono le variabili che determinano il successo di un progetto in un contesto in forte mutamento?
All'interno di un'intensa sessione collaborativa, cercheremo insieme di mettere a fuoco queste tematiche con l’idea di condividere approcci, strategie, strumenti e idee per nuove collaborazioni: imprese, professionisti e designers condivideranno le proprie esperienze in merito e cercheremo di comprendere in che modo mappare i fattori di criticità e di successo e di come misurare l'impatto dell'approccio design-driven in questi processi.

Workshop in Italian

18:00 — 18:15 ⁠

Stories on demand

Rita Casalini

Open Innovation Manager at Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane

Since the beginning of COVID emergency, we have had to manage a new change, a "transition in the transition". The process of change that we were building, today, is no longer a choice but an imperative. The whole new context has made us reconsider the things around us and forced us to look at them differently, it has challenged us to tackle risk and question things we previously took for granted. In this frame, Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane's commitment acts on two parallel fronts. On one hand, the identification of solutions of immediate application, more or less innovative solutions that allow us to meet the contingent needs. On the other hand, the achievement of long-term objectives, a more ambitious and challenging issue, to identify strategic projects that will allow us to build a new future, with strategic visions different from those previously imagined. Today more than ever, innovation is crucial.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesco Cancellato

Deputy Editor in Chief at Fanpage

18:30 — 19:15 ⁠

Live streams

Thomas Prehn

Strategist and Organizational Transformer

As former Director of the now-closed public sector lab, MindLab, and as Executive Director of the Danish Red Cross Youth, Thomas has pioneered organizational, behavioral and leadership transformation in the Danish public sector and the humanitarian one. He leveraged and disseminated his learnings and experiences internationally through leadership training and executive advisory of governments and organizations. As a recognized thought leader in the field of transformative culture and leadership, Thomas has advised governments in Europe, Asia, the US, and Latin America in public innovation and organizational transformation. He has also trained senior executives from international organizations in enthusiastic and effective leadership.

Building a Culture of Innovation
The nature of change is changing — due to exponential pace and complexity — leaving no time for strategizing and innovation workshops, hence innovation must be part of the organizational DNA. Not as methods, processes nor physical spaces, but as culture, fueled by an experimental mindset and dedication to learn. But what does innovation culture look like, how to change culture, and how to define success of cultural change? Thomas will distill innovation and culture from all the buzzwords and will share utilitarian examples of how he has worked with cultural transformation and tracked signs of success.

In dialogue with
Guido Romeo

Business and Innovation Journalist

June 18, 2020

12:30 — 13:00

Stories on demand

Andrea Ruckstuhl

Head of Continental Europe at Lendlease

What we are living today leads us to reflect on what the future of the city will be and the role of the developer in the design and construction of the city. How will we be able to respond to the new needs of the communities in which we operate? How can we create places that are safe for people and resilient? Many of these issues were already on the table of the technicians and all the operators who were thinking about models and formulas to take them forward. Today we are witnessing an acceleration of the process that drives a change which was needed in a sector that has been too long at the sideline of innovation and industrial processes. The potential to integrate deep tech solutions, which typically requires the private sector and a protected and federated open innovation approach (the so-called "federated innovation") together with a cross-sector pollination approach and a digital strategy in the whole design sector, are the issues on which we should focus.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesca Gambarini

Journalist at Corriere della Sera

18:00 — 18:15 ⁠

Stories on demand

Cristina Pozzi

Co-Founder at Impactscool

Studying the future at school means learning how to find traces of possible future scenarios in the present, to collect information and data. The methodologies we have at our disposal are interdisciplinary and allow us to work in the perspective of challenge-based learning, bringing design thinking, role-playing games, and debate to school as main tools to face, analyze and solve complex problems. This is where we can start a revolution in our educational system that goes in the direction of adopting more innovative methods for education, that can start from people and their needs. This is the approach of Impactscool, and it is essential to change the paradigm and put at the center of the educational goals the right skills and attitudes to face a complex, interconnected and constantly changing world.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesca Gambarini

Journalist at Corriere della Sera

18:30 — 19:15 ⁠

Live streams

Juha Leppänen

Chief Executive at Demos Helsinki

Juha Leppänen is a social scientist and serves as the Chief Executive at Demos Helsinki, leading independent Nordic think tank. Demos Helsinki works to ensure societal transformation that is both fair and sustainable through projects in over 20 countries around the world. Juha has served as advisor for multiple strategies, innovation and policy initiatives for both public and private organisations and as a speaker on forums such as Slush, Innovation Week and Smart Cities NYC. Prior to joining Demos Helsinki, Juha worked with media innovations focusing on mitigating the risks caused by media business models enforcing social filter bubbles.

Transformation through Experimentation
The world has to look different 15 years from now. After the current crises pass, climate crisis still exists. We have a lot of knowledge on how to tackle climate change, but we’re lagging behind in how societies should look like in the future. For meaningful action, we need to reimagine how our societies operate: how we live, how we move, how we interact?
Yet when we are able to imagine better futures, our institutions are unable to transform. Take the example of governments. One of the key purposes of governments is to maintain stability. We need new capabilities for governments to be able to push transformative agendas such as carbon neutrality. An example of this is policy experimentation. Enabling governments to learn from their mistakes when pushing through big reforms. Enabling politicians to explore also radical policy proposals that are needed for societies of the future.

In dialogue with
Guido Romeo

Business and Innovation Journalist

June 19, 2020

12:30 — 13:00

Stories on demand

Elena Lavezzi

Head of Southern Europe at Revolut

Revolut is one of the leading fintech companies in the world, an industry born out of the financial crisis of 2008, after which consumers have started to demand new and reliable financial services. It was the listening of people needs that led to the success of such solutions and of a company like Revolut, that has been able, in less than five years, to create a product that can meet customer demand and keeps growing according to its users' needs, adapting to the rapid changes in society.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesca Gambarini

Journalist at Corriere della Sera

15:30 — 17:30

Workshop

Diversità in smart working

curated by INDI

In recent months a new world has opened up for us, that of working from home 24/7: a novelty for everyone, even for those who were already used to managing their digital activities remotely. However, the experience of smart working is not the same for everyone. It is a possibility that only a small number of workers in Italy have had access to, who had the privilege during the lockdown of not having to expose themselves to external dangers, having the right space, tools and connectivity at their disposal.
Meanwhile, this is a work mode that has led to increase the gender gap, affecting mainly women. In fact, women have seen the domestic space became not only as a caregiver but also professional work, with a lengthening of working days and increasingly blurred boundaries between professional and private life. The hyper-productivity and hyper-reachability from remote work, aggravated by the growing fear for the economic instability we are facing, are producing a general increase in stress and burn-out, especially for those people who already had some adversities.
Smart working, however, is also synonymous with flexibility and decentralization, and represent a potential for the professional future of disadvantaged social groups, by normalizing the access to work of people with disabilities, hence breaking down more than any other regulation, any architectural barrier. In a world of innovation that still lacks in a respectful and inclusive approach to diversity, an evolution towards the normalization of smart working leads us to wonder what a future made of digital and flexible work can mean: what changes will it bring in our lives? which new possibilities and challenges might there be? which inclusive practices will we have to adopt or defend to ensure that different voices will be represented and defended?

Workshop in Italian

Initiative curated by
Agata Brilli, Alice Casiraghi, Chiara Francesca Albanesi, Claudia Minchilli, Claudia Pollina, Genni Piccirilli, Imke Bähr, Laura Toffetti, Roberta Tassi e Yulya Besplemennova

18:00 — 18:15 ⁠

Stories on demand

Luca Morena

Co-Founder at Nextatlas

Trend forecasting has always been driven by the intuition — sometimes justified, but more often without supporting evidence — of "experts" or inherently limited and imprecise methods. The advent of Big Data technologies — and the developments in areas such as artificial intelligence and machine learning — has enabled the innovation of processes in many areas where trend analysis has traditionally been limited, such as data collection, massive data analysis and the identification of macro-patterns invisible to the human eye. The profit in terms of predictive power, efficiency and scale for designers or strategists thanks to these technologies is clear. For instance, until recently, having a precise idea of what were the trendy colors or foods was almost impossible. Now it is about insights that are quite easy to get, thanks to data and technologies that are appropriate for the purpose. But new conceptual challenges also arise, from the reliability of algorithmic predictions to the bias of the datasets used, to the role of the designer when these AI evolve from being not only predictive but also generative, capable of generating original content, forcing us to reconsider the nature of a creative process, of inspiration and authorship.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesca Gambarini

Journalist at Corriere della Sera

18:30 — 19:15

Live streams

Kasey Klimes

Design Researcher

Kasey Klimes is a transdisciplinary design researcher focused on the intersection of evolutionary psychology, urban space, and complex systems. He currently leads design research for world-scale augmented reality in Google Maps. Previously, Kasey partnered with global cities including New York, San Francisco, Washington DC, Vancouver, Oslo, Moscow, and Sydney to reimagine their public spaces as infrastructure for social life. He’s also worked with startups to bring the process of urban civic engagement to more people through new platform technologies. His work has been featured in The Atlantic, Next City, and the Harvard Kennedy School's Government Innovators Network. Kasey believes in the power of design to facilitate our mutual interdependence and support collective human development. He holds a B.A. in Political Science, a Masters in City Planning from UC Berkeley, and currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

Designing for Complexity
Design is inherently a response to the needs of an ever-changing society, but do we have the knowledge-building toolkit these challenges demand? From economies, to cities, to natural ecologies, we live in a world of nested and deeply interconnected complex systems. A new mode of scientific inquiry shows great promise for informing the way designers approach some of the most pressing problems confronting humanity. This talk will identify the deficiencies of scientific reductionism as it is currently applied through design research, introduce complexity theory, and explore the lessons of systems thinking in iterative design. It will present and expand on the concepts of leverage points, feedback loops, emergence, mental models, and more.

In dialogue with
Guido Romeo

Business and Innovation Journalist

June 20, 2020

12:30 — 13:00

Stories on demand

Federica Alberti

Head of Corporate Affairs at Zambon

The great challenge of Zambon, chemical-pharmaceutical company, is to face daily change to better understand health demands, innovating the company while respecting its identity. Meeting the challenges of scientific, technological, and digital progress today means not just focusing on traditional molecular research but opening up at 360°. Changing the paradigm. For Zambon this change has been translated into a new Vision: "Innovating Cure and Care to make patients' lives better", this means going "beyond the pill", to identify and offer modern solutions that make patients' lives better, combining traditional therapies with new tools based on new digital technologies. The commitment to innovation does not only involve research and technology but is revealed on a series of different levels, for example by approaching distant worlds and languages: the Digital School, new workspaces for collaboration and barrier-free sharing, the OpenZone Talk, meetings with the protagonists of innovation to create the framework for our tomorrow, to keep up with the times and to maintain that "inspiring breath".

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesco Cancellato

Deputy Editor in Chief at Fanpage

18:00 — 18:15 ⁠

Stories on demand

Lorenzo Ferrario

Chief Technical Officer at D-Orbit

The space industry has been almost always characterized by large one-off development projects, aimed at the execution of space missions on behalf of large institutions, such as space agencies and governments. This modus operandi, in which the customer buys a satellite for himself, means that the producer cannot exercise all the engineering freedom necessary to create the most innovative and efficient system: this kind of satellite design does not pursue innovation, but rather the fulfillment of this or that customer's specific requirements. Therefore, a trend has emerged in the last 5-10 years (part of the more complex and varied "new space" movement) that follows a mix between manufacturer and service provider, with the birth of the concept of "satellite as a service" and related. D-Orbit, with the ION program, fully embraces this philosophy, positioning itself as a provider of different services (space transportation, payload hosting, Earth observation), all provided with the same class of satellite platforms which D-Orbit is both producer and operator. As a result, a paradigm transition has become necessary, and in D-Orbit's corporate organization is fulfilled, with a commercial area almost entirely devoted to the sale of services, and a technical area dedicated to the development and production of the spacecrafts that provide those services.

Speech in Italian

In dialogue with
Francesca Gambarini

Journalist at Corriere della Sera

18:30 — 19:15

Live streams

Andrew McWilliams

Program Director at ThoughtWorks Arts

Nouf Aljowaysir

Creative Technologist

Andrew McWilliams is a New York-based artist and technologist, founder and director of ThoughtWorks Arts and a founding member of ClimateAction.tech. His recent art projects explore links between climate change, perception and society, while his advocacy is centered on support and incubation for climate action in the tech industry. Andrew has exhibited at Armory Week in New York, HarvestWorks Digital Art Center in New York, Currents New Media Festival in New Mexico, and at the AlphaVille Festival of Post-Digital Culture in London. He has been awarded residencies at the Jaaga Residency Program in Bangalore, the I-Park Foundation in Connecticut, and has been nominated for a Creative Climate Award by the Human Impacts Institute in New York. Andrew has spoken at TEDx 2017 in Lithuania, Aaron Swartz Day in San Francisco and Creative Tech Week in New York. His programs and work have been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, ThinkProgress, Clot Magazine, Technically Brooklyn, Engadget and PBS NewsHour.
Nouf Aljowaysir is a Brooklyn-based artist and creative coder - recently awarded the Simulacra & Similitude: Synthetic Media residency at ThoughtWorks Arts. As a creative technologist at Havas New York, she is leading the research and development of artificially intelligent prototypes as tools for design. Her artistic projects focus on the rapid acceleration of technology to create inspiring new narrative forms while turning it on itself. With a light sense of humor and irony, her projects criticize how these advances have become a means of domination, control, and exploitation. Her work has been shown in galleries and festivals in the US and Europe, including the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam (IDFA), SXSW 2019, Sundance Story Lab, and Tribeca Film Festival 2020.

Confronting the Unknown — Art as Technology Research
The world is changing fast. Today’s future is tomorrow’s present. COVID-19 outbreak is teaching us a hard lesson while establishing a new and pervasive exposure of everyone to digital tools and channels even in daily, more traditional activities. All the digital/virtual/asynchronous interactions are not experienced anymore as the "poor and geek" alternative to real experiences, but as effective means to preserve our relationship and enrich our lives. At ThoughtWorks, to gain a better glimpse of the future ahead, we started engaging artists, empowering investigations into impacts of emerging technologies on industry, culture and society. Leveraging art to imagine the unimaginable and the unbelievable, join us for 45 minutes to learn how artists open windows onto emerging futures, how we can engage with and learn from artists’ approaches to emerging technologies, and how this mindset can help us innovate today.

In dialogue with
Guido Romeo

Business and Innovation Journalist

Alessandro Confetti

Tech Principal at ThoughtWorks